How disinformation works and the colors of a pepper

About a month ago we unintentionally shared misinformation on our social networks (the fault of the one who published it). It is still paradoxical that a facebook page that was born with the purpose of dispelling false information took only weeks to publish false information, so I apologize. Of course, it was not proprietary content, but an article published in the BBC, information that was also published by some others Spanish media.

It became quickly apparent that our followers know more about agriculture than I do, as we were immediately reprimanded, and I promised to consult Manuel, our field technician. He very kindly explained to me that this information is false, although not in its entirety.

It is true that all green peppers would turn another color if they were allowed to mature, so there is no green pepper seed. But it’s false to say that the yellow, orange or red peppers are the same fruit at different stages of ripening. When you buy a seed, you choose the variety and color of the pepper. For example, the red hot pepper turns from green to red, as you can see in this photo of our greenhouse on our Nijar farm, and these are the only two colors you will ever get.

So, where does this bad information come from? Well as you can see in the Atresmedia video, this started with a tweet from a UK blogger that went viral and that, despite being denied by a botanist James Wong, is still published and misinforming the media in different countries, which spread through social networks, such as our facebook.

They say that when you see information about a topic that you know, you realize how everything else is written. Society deserves better journalism, and journalists deserve an improved working conditions, to have time to confirm the facts they share, and not to reproduce false viral information. Until this happens, and always, we have to use more critical thinking with what we read in the press and social networks. We have already deleted the Facebook article, and we’ll be more careful next time.

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